Letting Go Of Old Material Will Help Improve Your Writing Skills

We have all written the perfectly brilliant sentence and then not known what to do with it. Because although it’s the perfectly worded sentence (or perfectly worded paragraph), it just doesn’t go anywhere in our current writing. We read it over and over again, admiring our perfectly crafted words. Or paragraphs. Sharing them with friends and colleagues. In fact, we will also write a whole article around the perfectly worded passage. Everyone we know gets it, which is what makes it so wonderful.

And yet, as we keep writing every day, this brilliant sentence (or paragraph) somehow doesn’t belong with any of our current writing. But it’s so well-crafted and so admired. However, outside of our small circle of friends, no one seems to appreciate it as much as we do. What gives?

It’s the something that writers have struggled with for centuries.

How to let go of writing that is eloquent and well-crafted, but doesn’t fit in with any profitable writing that you are working on. And letting go of good writing is extremely hard to do. Because a well-written sentence is something you can put your name on. It makes you sound intelligent. Worth reading more. But where is the more?

There isn’t any more. That’s because this well-crafted sentence or paragraph is so insightful, so observant, that it stands alone. Utterly alone. And that is disruptive to your daily writing.

This is because if you are a good writer, people want to read your writing. Devour it. Lots of it. And readers aren’t so stuck on one sentence from a prolific writer as they want to read a whole book from them and get the overall effect. And you can’t write volumes of work for people to read if you hang all of your writing prowess on one brilliant sentence or paragraph that you have written, which doesn’t go with the rest of your writing.

So if you find yourself with a perfectly worded sentence like this, let it go. And it’s easier to do these days, because with any word processing software on your computer, you can simply cut the odd sentence from your manuscript and paste it into another document.

What you may find, later on, is that with further reflection, this brilliant sentence is the start of a completely different paragraph. Or an article. Or maybe even a whole book. So, by letting a brilliant sentence go (putting it aside for later) not only can you get back to the focused writing at hand but you can also look forward to a future project that is already in the works. A brilliant project.

And by the time you get to it, your writing skills will have improved to the point where you will be ready to write the rest of what goes with this brilliant sentence or paragraph. In fact, this sentence was probably just the result of your writing skills improving while you were writing something a little more mundane.

But don’t be afraid to finish and publish something that might not be your best work. Because writing and publishing something every day is an important part of the writing process. And more than anything, people who love to read, love to read their favorite authors every day. They want to hear from you regularly, and they are a little more forgiving than you might think.



Source by Brent Hollister